Wednesday, November 19, 2014

9 December 2014: Fiscal Space and Budget Management

Richard Hemming
Duke Center for International Development

Date: December 9, 2014
Time: 03:30 P.M.

Venue:
Auditorium, Ground Floor, Old Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

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Friday, November 14, 2014

20 November 2014: Credit Access and the Poor

Abhijit Banerjee
MIT

Date: November 20, 2014
Time: 10:30 A.M.

Venue:
Economics Lecture Theatre
Department of Economics,
Delhi School of Economics,
New Delhi-110007(INDIA)

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Monday, November 10, 2014

13 November 2014: Can the Major Public Works Policy Buffer Negative Shocks in Early Childhood?

Aparajita Dasgupta
Population Council

Abstract:
The study examines the role of the largest public works program in the world-the National Rural  Employment Guarantee Scheme (NREGS) – in buffering the negative effects of early childhood exposure to rainfall shocks on long-term health outcomes. Exploiting the spatial and temporal variation in NREGS coverage, the study estimates the extent to which nutritional shocks in early childhood can be offset by access to the policy. The study employs a unique identification  strategy by integrating detailed administrative records of drought shock and phase-wise roll-out information of NREGS with a household level panel data-the Young Lives survey- conducted over three waves (2002, 2007 and 2009 -10) in the state of Andhra Pradesh, India. Using individual fixed effects estimation the study finds that while the policy does not help correct for long term past health deficiencies it is useful in buffering recent drought shocks, which varies by policy relevant sub-groups. 

Date: November 13, 2014
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Seminar Room (First Floor)
Department of Economics,
Delhi School of Economics,
New Delhi-110007(INDIA)

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12 November 2014: State Spatial Rescaling in India Subnational States and the Politics of Economic Restructuring

Loraine Kennedy
Centre for South Asian Studies, Paris and Centre for Social Science and Humanities, New Delhi

Abstract:
State re-scaling is the central concept mobilized in Loraine Kennedy’s new book to interpret the political processes that are producing new economic spaces in India. In the quarter century since economic reforms were introduced, the Indian economy has experienced strong growth accompanied by extensive sectoral and spatial restructuring. The book argues that in this reformed institutional context, where both state spaces and economic geographies are being rescaled, subnational states play an increasingly critical role in coordinating socioeconomic activities.

The core thesis is that the reform process has profoundly reconfigured the Indian state’s rapport with its territory at all spatial scales, and these processes of state spatial rescaling are crucial for comprehending emerging patterns of economic governance and growth. It demonstrates that the outcomes of India’s new policy regime are not only the product of impersonal market forces, but that they are also the result of endogenous political strategies, acting in conjunction with the territorial reorganisation of economic activities at various scales, ranging from local to global. Extensive empirical case material, primarily from field-based research, is used to support the book’s theoretical assertions.

Loraine Kennedy will present the book’s main arguments and elaborate on several case studies that form the empirical basis of her thesis, including the implementation of the SEZ policy in Haryana, the use of spatial engineering instruments in Andhra Pradesh and industrial estate development in Tamil Nadu.

Date: November 12, 2014
Time: 05:00 P.M.

Venue:
CSH library,
2 Aurangzeb Road,
New Delhi – 110011

Location:

Wednesday, October 15, 2014

16 October 2014: Does access to NREGA mitigate negative impacts of early childhood shocks? Evidence from Andhra Pradesh, India

Aparajita Dasgupt
Population Council

Date: October 16, 2014
Time: 02:30 P.M.

Venue:
Mezzanine Floor,
Akbar Bhawan,
Satya Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi-110021(India)

Location:

Monday, October 13, 2014

14 October 2014: What Was Indian Planning? Observations from the International History of Nehruvian Planning

David C Engerman
Brandeis University

Date: October 14, 2014
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Committee Room
Centre for Policy Research,
Dharma Marg, Chanakyapuri,
New Delhi–110021(INDIA)

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Monday, September 15, 2014

18 September 2014: Revealed Preference for Open Defecation: Evidence from a New Survey in Rural North India

Dean Spears
Rice Institute and Centre for Development Economics

Abstract:
Despite economic growth, government latrine construction, and increasing recognition among policy-makers that it constitutes a health and human capital crisis, open defecation remains stubbornly widespread in rural India. Indeed, 67% of rural Indian households in the 2011 census reported defecating in the open. We present evidence from new survey data collected in villages in five states in India: Bihar, Haryana, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Uttar Pradesh. We find that rural households do not build inexpensive latrines of the sort that commonly reduce open defecation and save lives in Bangladesh, Southeast Asia, and sub-Saharan Africa. Many survey respondents‘ behaviour reveals a preference for open defecation: over 40% of households with a working latrine have at least one member who defecates in the open. In the sample from the four largest states, more than half of people in households which own a government latrine defecate in the open. We apply a demographic model of latrine use which predicts that if the government were to build a latrine for every rural household that lacks one, without changing sanitation preferences, most people in our sample in these states would nevertheless defecate in the open. Further evidence supports a preference for open defecation: many survey respondents report that open defecation is more pleasurable and desirable than latrine use. Among people who defecate in the open, a majority report that widespread open defecation would be at least as good for child health as latrine use by everyone in the village. These findings suggest that intensifying existing policies of latrine construction will not be enough to substantially reduce open defecation. Policy-makers in India must lead a large scale campaign to promote latrine use.

Date: September 18, 2014
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Seminar Room (First Floor)
Department of Economics,
Delhi School of Economics,
New Delhi-110007(INDIA)

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