Saturday, February 6, 2016

8-12 February 2016: Lecture Series on "The Public Economics of Health Policy in Developing Countries"

Jeffrey S. Hammer
Princeton University

Abstract:
This talk presents the basic principles of public economics as it applies to the health sector in developing countries. It identifies the characteristic market failures related to health and healthcare, examining three broad categories of policies: 1) public goods, preventive and promotive services 2) primary, curative, health care and 3) hospital based care or insurance. Going somewhat beyond standard economics, it compares the potential welfare improvement of the different categories of interventions to their relative difficulty of implementation to discuss priority setting given practical constraints. While general in scope, most examples are drawn from Indian experience and research.

Date: February 8-12, 2016
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
Ground Floor Conference Hall
R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Please confirm your participation at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

5 February 2016: An experimental evaluation of IFMR Rural Channels financial education programme

Karuna Krishnaswamy
GIZ

Abstract:
In recent years there has been rising interest among financial service providers, NGOs and policymakers in educating customers and potential customers to enable them to make informed decisions on the use of financial products. However, many open questions remain. In this paper, we study IFMR Rural Channels (IRCS) short duration financial education intervention, the Master Trainer Programme, to find out if there is a business case for a financial services provider to incorporate provider-neutral financial education programmes into its operations as envisaged by Indian regulators. This short-duration programme consists of a 45 minute group presentation on financial awareness followed by individual one-on-one visits if requested by the participant. One of the goals of the programme was to promote optimal take-up of products among (especially inactive) customers. We conducted two randomized controlled trials to (1) gauge the impact of the intervention on financial awareness, financial behaviour and usage of products (2) gauge the correlation between awareness and product usage.

Date: February 5, 2016
Time: 11:30 A.M.

Venue:
Seminar Room 2
Indian Statistical Institute Delhi Centre,
7, S. J. S. Sansanwal Marg,
New Delhi-110016 (INDIA)

Location:

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Friday, January 29, 2016

5 Februry 2016: Lonely Journey: from Economics to Law and back

Frederic Jenny
Chairman, OECD Committee on Competition

Organised by:
CUTS International and Society of Indian Law Firms (SILF)

Chair:
Justice B N Srikrishna, former Judge, Supreme Court of India

Abstract:
The lecture is being organised against the background that as a result of deregulation, the development of competition law and trade liberalisation, there is an increasing number of economic issues which are now dealt with by the judiciary. This means that a number of legal decisions need not only to be well founded from the legal perspective but also to be economically relevant. Yet in many countries judges are not trained in economic matters, just like many economists are not trained in legal matters. This raises the question of what can be done to improve the mutual understanding between law and economics and between judges and economists.

Frederic Jenny, a professor of economics and antitrust enforcer who spent eight  years as a judge  on the French Supreme Court (Cour de cassation), will address those issues in the light of his experience on the bench and of the experience of the OECD Committee which he chairs.

Date: February 5, 2016
Time: 06:00 P.M.

Venue:
Lecture Room 1, Annexe,
India International Centre,
40, Max Mueller Marg,
New Delhi 110003 (India)

Location:

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Thursday, January 28, 2016

1 February 2016: The Problem of Sustainability in China’s Development

Pan Wei, Peking University 

Program Agenda

Chair:
Samir Saran, Observer Research Foundation

Abstract:
The Chinese growth model and developmental history are not only mainstay in public policy but are being emulated by countries seeking similar growth trajectories. The success of the model has propelled China not only as global superpower but the emerging example of an alternate growth strategy to the traditional western notions. Yet in recent years, a slight slowdown in the economy has been noticed. While the Chinese government is aiming to re-balance the economy, shifting the focus towards consumption and services, China’s growth model has faltered slightly for the first time in 25 years. This slight discrepancy in what has been a relatively strong growth trajectory has implications on the sustainability of the Chinese developmental agenda as well as the globe. As China moves forward it will have to play a precarious balancing act between maintaining a strong and robust economy and creating sustainable methods and strategies that can help it continue its development journey. What this balance looks like is still to be decided. 

Date: February 1, 2016
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
ORF Conference Room
Observer Research Foundation
20 Rouse Avenue Institutional Area
New Delhi-110002(INDIA)

Location:


Note:
Please confirm at prashantkumar@orfonline.org

29th January 2016: Patrilocality Norm & Household decision-making: Does the presence of in-laws affect married women in India?

Aditi Dimri
Universite catholique de Louvain and Paris School of Economics

Abstract:
This paper sheds new light on, if and how, the cultural norm of living with parent-in-laws after marriage affects the outcomes of the daughter-in-law in the household. To isolate the causal effect of the presence of an in-law in this highly endogenous setting, I use the death of the father-in-law or mother-in-law as an exogenous event changing the household composition. Using household level panel data, I estimate a double-difference model comparing groups that experience a death and those that do not between 2005 and 2012. First, I explore the allocation of household decision-making-say amongst the four members based on a framework allowing for gender spheres, and generational & spousal transfers. I find that the daughter-in-law is the worst-off, however, contrary to anecdotal evidence this is because of the household composition leading to stronger gender roles and patriarchy. Second, I find improvement in objective outcomes of the daughter-in-law like having cash in hand, her self-reported health, and frequency of visits to natal family. Such understandings of household decision-making can be important for targeting policies better, and shed light on the role of norms in determining socio-economic outcomes.

Date: January 29, 2016
Time: 11:30 A.M.

Venue:
Seminar Room 2
Indian Statistical Institute Delhi Centre,
7, S. J. S. Sansanwal Marg,
New Delhi-110016 (INDIA)

Location:

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Wednesday, January 27, 2016

29 January 2016: Turkey and Regional Security in the Middle East

Presenters:
Turkey, the Islamic State and the Emerging Power Balance in the Region
Alper Dede, Fatih University, Turkey and
Oguz Delik, Zirve University, Turkey

Challenges to Turkey's Domestic Security 
Andreas Kotelis, Bilkent University, Turkey

Anwar Alam, Zirve University, Turkey will also be joining for the discussion

Chair:
Nandan Unnikrishnan, Observer Research Foundation

Date: January 29, 2016
Time: 03:00 P.M.

Venue:
ORF Conference Hall
Observer Research Foundation
20 Rouse Avenue Institutional Area
New Delhi-110002(INDIA)

Location:


Note:
RSVP at kanchigupta@orfonline.org

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

25 January 2016: Why Does the Global Economy Fail to Pick Up?

Ashoka Mody
Princeton University

Chaired by:
Montek Singh Ahluwalia

Abstract:
Every IMF global forecast expresses disappointment that growth has come in lower than expected but then goes on to promise that a pick up is around the corner. This has now gone on for 7 years. Why? The story forecasters tell always centers around some exceptional event just before the forecast. That is no longer credible. Do other stories: such as financial disruption and secular stagnation hold up? Or is this a simpler tale of a long-term decline in global productivity growth that was obscured by a global bubble, which has yet to fully burst?

Date: January 25, 2016
Time: 04:30 P.M.

Venue:
Conference Hall, Ground Floor, R&T Building
National Institute of Public Finance and Policy,
18/2 Satsang Vihar Marg, Special Institutional Area,
New Delhi-110067(INDIA)

Location:

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Note:
Those who are interested may please confirm your participation to Mr. Bins Sebastian at bins.sebastian@nipfp.org.in latest by Wednesday, 24th January 2016